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kabbalah protection amulet

Hamsa - Kabbalah Protection Amulet

The mystical beliefs and signs for protection from the evil eye exist in all cultures, and all have the same goal: to create a sense of security and control. But above all lies the "hand of God" the Hamsa.

In all religions and cultures, there are mystical amulets aimed at creating a subjective sense of security and control in the hearts of believers, but the most powerful Kabbalah Protection Amulet is the Hamsa.

In ancient times, strange events and mysterious phenomena plagued one’s mind to the point of terror.

People believed that these phenomena would prevent finding the opposing force. One of the human fears revolves around the matter of the evil eye.

The Term "Evil Eye" In the Bible

In the Bible’s language, the term “evil eye” indicates people with an evil soul or people with a specific deficiency who see everything they lack and cannot achieve with an evil eye in their grief and mental suffering.

As already mentioned, many believe that because of jealousy, other people can cast an evil eye on them that could endanger them.

During the periods, there were various amulets to which humans attributed spiritual powers and were considered effective in achieving success and abundance.

Therefore, it is possible to observe standard lines and sometimes even conceptual connections between the world of Jewish mysticism alongside the Muslim and the other cultures.

One of the standard symbols between Judaism and Islam is Hamsa.

In a Jewish hamsa, the fingers face upwards, with a masculine meaning with an affinity for Moses’ blessing in his appeal to the Creator.

In a Muslim Hamsa, the fingers face down with a female intention appeals to the underworld forces and brings good luck.

The Hamsa usually appears in a symmetrical structure, where the toe and the flow are identical and parallel. However, some hamsas shapes are more anatomically correct forms.

In a Jewish hamsa, the fingers face upwards, with a masculine meaning with an affinity for Moses’ blessing in his appeal to the Creator. In a Muslim Hamsa, the fingers face down with a female intention appeals to the underworld forces and brings good luck.

Archaeological findings attest to the use of the hamsa symbol – as a talisman for the preservation and protection of residents

The origins of the Hamsa are ancient and are not known for sure. However, archaeological findings attest to the use of the hamsa symbol – the palm whose fingers point downwards, as a talisman for the preservation and protection of residents of the Mediterranean basin region in the period preceding its appearance in monotheistic religions.

Some attribute its origins to the moon goddess “Tannit” from Carthage – a Phoenician colony along with Tunis. But in fact, the original symbol of “Tannit” was not a palm but a triangular body shape with two horizontal hands. With the development of monotheistic religions, Tannit gave way to another, Fatima, Muhammad’s daughter.

Fatima, Muhammad's Daughter

Fatima burned her hand in a boiling casserole after seeing her husband bring another woman to their home. Her tears fell through a crack in the wall and hit her husband’s shoulder, which prevented him from consummating his marriage to another. From this, the Muslim faith in Hamsa or its synonym “Fatima’s Hand” is explained, and the eye drawn in the Hamsa is presented in the tear story.

In Arabic and the barbaric language, which originated in the tribes of north-west Africa, the symbol of the hand, the digit five, and the eye are combined with the phrase “five fingers in your eyes” as if your evil eyes were unable to carry out their plot. Therefore, Muslims dip their hands in color (usually blue) and mark their door with a palm print.

According to the Muslim faith, the sign prevents spirits, demons, and an evil eye from entering the house.

celebs wearing Hamsa hand

But from a Jewish source, some believe that the origin of the Hamsa is in the palm of Miriam, Moshe, and Aaron’s sister.

Others argue that the idea of five fingers is a symbol for marking the house lintel with blood during the firstborn plague.

Kabbalah Protection Amulet

According to Kabbalah, the Jewish Hamsa represents the fifth letter- He, a symbol of the Creator and the five books that make up the Torah.

Rabbi Yitzhak says: “The blessing is hidden to the eye”, hence the combination of the Hamsa and the eye painted in it.

Just as there is an evil eye, there is also the “good eye” – the blessing and the sympathetic kabbalah protection amulet. It is also possible that the Hamsa, whose symbol is an open hand, indicates giving, discovering, and appealing for peace as opposed to the boxed and clenched hand with a belligerent symbol.

The conceptual significance of the Hamsa stems from fear of the evil eye and upheavals of luck and fate. The mind is full of dread, conscious and unconscious – some are accumulated and collected throughout our lives as part of social and environmental influences, and some are innate.

The arc of beliefs and signs of preservation and protection from the evil eye is extensive but above all lies Hamsa, which is well-rooted in the folklore of different cultures.